Yes, I know I’ve already complained about how ridiculous the credit card dispute process is, but we lost another dispute filed by a customer in what couldn’t have been more clearly a legitimate, authorized order and charge.

The customer ordered a rug from our online store, received the rug, and then decided to dispute the charge as fraudulent because, well, why not get your money back, too?

Here’s what we submitted to the customer’s bank as evidence that the charge was valid:

  • Email correspondence with the customer in which he requested a copy of the receipt for his order and asked when it would ship.

  • According to his bank, the card number, name, and CVV (security code) the customer entered at checkout were correct.

  • The order was shipped to the credit card billing address, which passed both the street address and zip code AVS checks with his bank (meaning the billing address and, therefore, shipping address exactly match the address the bank has for this customer’s card).

  • Tracking information from FedEx, including proof of delivery signature.

  • The customer’s IP address and phone number area code are located in the same city as the billing and shipping address.

To sum up, the customer most definitely placed an order on our website for a rug, which we shipped and delivered without issue. Yet, after more than two months of grueling investigation, including zero calls, zero emails, zero correspondence of any kind other than the initial evidence we submitted, the customer’s bank sided with him, deemed the charge fraudulent, and forced us to provide a full refund and pay additional dispute fees.

Case closed. There’s no way to contact the bank, appeal the decision, or even understand the convincing argument made by the customer that won the hearts of those on the panel over all logic and reason.

The real fraud is in the dispute, not the original charge, and the issuing banks are complicit.